Intro to James

Hey everyone! Today I’m going to hit a few major points regarding the Letter of James by way of a very brief, and very broad, introduction. I’ll also direct you to additional resources in case you’re interested in doing more research on your own. As I alluded to yesterday, there’s much more to James than you might think!

Authorship – The vast majority of scholars believe evidence points to James, the brother of Jesus, as the author of this letter. There are six other Jameses in the Bible, but only one has received serious consideration beyond the one already mentioned:  James, the son of Zebedee. However, his early date of death in AD 44 makes him questionable since the letter appears to have been written around that same time.

On the other hand, James, the brother of Jesus, was a leader in the early church and was martyred in AD 62. If you’re interested in the various discussions regarding authorship, the three commentaries listed below are a good place to start. For my study purposes, I’m going with James, the brother of Jesus, as the assumed author.

Audience – Almost as much discussion has evolved around James’ audience as authorship! It seems pretty obvious.  James comes right out in verse 1 and says he’s writing “To the twelve tribes scattered among the nations.” BUT… does he mean to limit the twelve tribes to the messianic Jews who are direct descendants of the Old Testament, or does he mean to include gentiles in this greeting lending a more multiracial, New Testament audience?

As we’ll see later in this study, James appears to be highly devoted to Jewish scripture and faith, while believing in Jesus as the Messiah. After reading the different arguments, I tend to lean toward an audience of messianic Jews. I believe James says exactly what he means: He’s writing to the twelve tribes of the diaspora.

Themes – James’ audience also has “issues” to deal with:  divisiveness, intolerance, and favoritism in the church, as well as individual desire for wealth and status over everything else – including God. They’ve been influenced by false teachers and have turned the church into a social club.

In addressing all these problems, James will write about suffering, sin, righteousness, and holy wisdom. His letter is brief, but he gives just enough details that we’ll also get a glimpse of his theology regarding the Trinity, eschatology, the Torah, ethics of Christian life, and – of course – faith, works, and justification.

It’s hard to believe all that gets packed into this short letter, but as we learned from Ephesians (and are now seeing in Philippians), it pays to read all scripture – short or long – slowly, closely, thoughtfully, and prayerfully.

I believe we come into a time of communion with the Father, Son, and Spirit when we meditate on scripture in this way, becoming a participating member of the Body of Christ in relationship to the Trinity. Other than the Eucharist, I can’t think of any other time when I feel as close to God as when I ‘listen’ to scripture speak.

Resources – I recommend that you watch The Bible Project video on James. Excellent resource from them, as always. I’m also relying on three different commentaries for my personal study.  (Just to clarify… I always read scripture first, at least three times over, before I ever consult anything written about scripture. Always keep the primary thing primary!) These are all available in print or on Kindle, if you’re looking to build your library. Or you can just keep following along here — I’ll be sharing a LOT of their information!

  • The Letter of James, The New International Commentary on the New Testament, by Scot McKnight
  • The Letter of James, Pillar New Testament Commentary Series, by Douglas Moo
  • James: The NIV Application Commentary, by David Nystrom

So there you have it: a super short intro to the Letter of James. Between this and The Bible Project video, you should have a good idea of what to expect. Take the next day or so and read James through two or three times – preferably at least once out loud. Underline, star, highlight, or write down anything that really catches your attention. You never know where the Spirit is leading you. Meet you here again later in the week. Take care!

REMINDERS: 

  • Philippians Bible Study with Cory on Facebook, Wednesday at 6:30.
  • Pray, pray, pray.  Build your friendship with God, and love your neighbor as yourself.
  • Quarantining? Stay connected. Going out? Be a blessing.

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Almighty and eternal God, so draw our hearts to you, so guide our minds, so fill our imaginations, so control our wills, that we may be wholly yours, utterly dedicated to you; and then use us, we pray, as you will, always to your glory and the welfare of your people. Through our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ, we pray. Amen. (Book of Common Prayer)

Wednesday of Holy Week

A Few Odds & Ends

  • Missions, outreach, and everyday expenses don’t stop for COVID-19. Donations to NCUMC may be mailed to P.O. Box 194, New Castle KY 40050.
  • The Bible Project has released a new video on Gospel of The Kingdom. In this video, the writers trace the origins of the word “gospel” and how it ties the story of the Old Testament together with the story of Jesus and his announcement of God’s kingdom. Jesus brought God’s rule and reign to the world in a very upside-down way, which is the best news you could ask for!
  • If you have a little time on your hands and are looking for additional worship, please check out the Asbury Seminary Chapel Archives. There are even a few messages specific to the COVID-19 challenges we’re facing. I always enjoyed attending chapel services when I was on campus in Wilmore. Very special.
  • Christianity Today published a short essay called, “Simple Church.” The author describes his experience of church before big screens and multimedia (which I remember very clearly). I think you’ll find it a good reminder that no matter where we all are this Easter Sunday morning, church has not been cancelled!flowers-png-transparent-background-2

 

From Today’s Lectionary Reading

Hebrews 12:1-3 (ESV)

Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted.

May the grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit be with you all. (2 Cor. 13:14)

Agape

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Peace be to the brothers, and love with faith, from God the Father and the Lord Jesus Christ.  Grace be with all who love our Lord Jesus Christ with love incorruptible.” Ephesians 6:23-24

As we talked about during this morning’s class, the Greeks had four primary words for love: agape, eros, storge, and philia. The one Paul chooses to use in his letters is agape – a self-sacrificing, unconditional love like the one God has for his children. This is the type of love shared by Christians who form the body of Christ. It is a love that calls for action.

The New York Life Insurance Company released a commercial this past Super Bowl Sunday that talks about the ancient Greek words for love. In the end, it’s still a commercial; but, they do a really good job of reminding us of the truly important things in life. Click to view:  Agape Commercial